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Mary Macey Butler
"Mary Macey Butler's photographs are sensuous and simple. She creates images that I feel as much as I see. For any photographer, such accomplishment demands enormous and painstaking attention to both craft and self over a long period of time. You don't get there in a hurry but, if and when you do, the resulting images, like Mary's, are evocative, compelling, and memorable." -Freeman Patterson, photographer
"Mary Macey Butler has learned to convey the intense beauty of nature photography." -The late Ernest Braun,, photographer
(Artist Statement)
I walk around, looking at the world. I am interested in graphic order, architectural lines, trees, images with mystery, abstract shapes.  I like to pursue subjects in depth, those that promote thoughts, feelings, or an impression.   I create images that have a quiet subtle impact or make a bold statement.  I tend to use longer (telephoto)  lenses and then remind myself to look at the larger picture.  I end up going closer and cropping, always trying to simplify, to find the essence.  I frequently  use a tripod, as I can see better with one.  I care about sharpness when sharpness is required, but I also like the pleasure of motion photography, which is very freeing. Many photographers have influenced me.  Freeman Patterson of New Brunswick, Canada has been an important influence throughout my career.   He is a master of the art of seeing and I have been drawn to his photography, both visually and emotionally.  I learned a lot about motion photography from Richard Martin of Kingston, Canada, who helped me learn the freedom to ‘play’ with my camera, along with Andre Gallant, another Canadian, who has emboldened me to experiment and push the limits of creativity. I am sometimes asked if my photographs are paintings, perhaps because of their emphasis on composition, color and line, shape and form.  These painterly qualities often elicit a range of emotional responses.  My intention is for viewers to appreciate the whole composition, and especially the quiet places in my work.   
"Mary Macey Butler's photographs are sensuous and simple. She creates images that I feel as much as I see. For any photographer, such accomplishment demands enormous and painstaking attention to both craft and self over a long period of time. You don't get there in a hurry but, if and when you do, the resulting images, like Mary's, are evocative, compelling, and memorable." -Freeman Patterson, photographer
"Mary Macey Butler has learned to convey the intense beauty of nature photography." -The late Ernest Braun,, photographer
(Artist Statement)
I walk around, looking at the world. I am interested in graphic order, architectural lines, trees, images with mystery, abstract shapes.  I like to pursue subjects in depth, those that promote thoughts, feelings, or an impression.   I create images that have a quiet subtle impact or make a bold statement.  I tend to use longer (telephoto)  lenses and then remind myself to look at the larger picture.  I end up going closer and cropping, always trying to simplify, to find the essence.  I frequently  use a tripod, as I can see better with one.  I care about sharpness when sharpness is required, but I also like the pleasure of motion photography, which is very freeing. Many photographers have influenced me.  Freeman Patterson of New Brunswick, Canada has been an important influence throughout my career.   He is a master of the art of seeing and I have been drawn to his photography, both visually and emotionally.  I learned a lot about motion photography from Richard Martin of Kingston, Canada, who helped me learn the freedom to ‘play’ with my camera, along with Andre Gallant, another Canadian, who has emboldened me to experiment and push the limits of creativity. I am sometimes asked if my photographs are paintings, perhaps because of their emphasis on composition, color and line, shape and form.  These painterly qualities often elicit a range of emotional responses.  My intention is for viewers to appreciate the whole composition, and especially the quiet places in my work. 
Mary Macey Butler